Negative results and dodgy papers: keep quiet or publish?

Negative results are very rarely published in the literature. After all, the literature is bursting with new positive results and we don’t have enough time to read all of these, let alone papers describing what doesn’t work. Negative results are dull—who would want to read anything in the Journal of Negative Results?

Up until recently I haven’t had a problem with the status quo. I’m afraid the following discussion is a bit vague because I’m (still) not sure about how much detail I can go into my work, but please bear with me.

I came across a paper published this year which describes the effect of doing something quite specific in a synthesis on nanoparticle shape. Do the thing, get a particular nanoparticle shape (usually quite challenging to obtain); stop doing the thing, you get another shape (easy to obtain). I was quite excited because if it worked it would get around a major barrier to my desired nanoparticles.

I repeated the reaction exactly as the paper described, but it didn’t work.

I repeated the reaction in a flow reactor as it would make it easy to intensify the “thing”. According to the paper, this should definitely give the desired nanoparticles because the morphology selectivity/yield is directly proportional to the intensity of the “thing”. But it still didn’t work.

I’ve now given up on the reaction and moved on to something else. But that my results will not be published means that someone else could also waste a lot of time and money—on equipment, reagents, electron microscopy—repeating the experiment.

What can I do? I think I have three options:

Option 1: Do nothing.

I’ve already made it clear that I don’t like this option. I’m fairly sure the paper is wrong. It bugs me that it exists without some kind of mark against it.

Option 2: Email the authors.

I’m not too keen on this either. I suspect that my email would be ignored. Plus, I would rather any discussion happened in the open, which brings me on to…

Option 3: Blog about it (and possibly email the authors telling them that I blogged about it).

I feel uneasy about this. Could it be perceived as confrontational? Would I get a reputation as a troublemaker? I feel like it is the proper, scientific and open thing to do, but in reality it is absolutely not the done thing. I suspect most researchers would go for option one and do nothing. I could be right and the paper is wrong, but I’d be very happy to be proven wrong and get the reaction working.

What you think? Keep quiet, email or blog? Any other suggestions are welcome.